In Summary
  • The truth is that we are all imperfect people who need a perfect God to help us determine what we do, including how to relate to those who are very  different from us.
  • Adopting a new perspective,  which is free of selfishness, takes one away  from the typical behaviour that seems to plague many relationships.

We live in a world in which marriage does not make sense to some people.  What such people do not realise is the extent to which many of those getting into marital relationships pretend just so that they can win over their partner. From the many people I have counselled and recent reading I have been doing, it never ceases to amaze me how many young people are interested in short-term relationships but have lost faith in marriage. 

The questions remains: Is marriage necessary? If so, is it worth dying for or giving your whole self to?

The truth is that we are all imperfect people who need a perfect God to help us determine what we do, including how to relate to those who are very  different from us. Adopting a new perspective,  which is free of selfishness, takes one away  from the typical behaviour that seems to plague many relationships.

Getting what most people refer to as the “right person” to be in a relationship with is as important as being the “right person” for your partner. Marriage is about two individuals with strengths, weaknesses and faults making a conscious choice to relate to each other and who, according to their judgement, might not measure up. 

At the age of 23, Jane (not her real name), was madly in love and had high hopes in their relationship, expecting her man to be faultless. What she forgot was that there is nothing like a perfect man or woman. The reality is that when you choose to be in a relationship with someone, you get the full package, including their history, friendships, attitudes, background, and character. 

Every individual who wishes to be in a relationship should be ready for “an exciting adventure” and “lasting life change.” There is nothing less when it comes to relationships. Relationships can challenge us and help us rethink and realign our worldview. The reality is that getting into a relationship opens for us a life-changing journey of disclosure, discovery and decision-making as we distinguish between what aligns with our core beliefs and what does not. When we do this, we give ourselves an opportunity to learn and grow in the relationship. 

The outcome continues to manifest itself in many feelings not fulfilled by the promise of marriage. The selfishness, separation, divorce and abuse experienced in families continues to leave behind not only wounded spouses, but also disoriented children. If one partner feels such betrayal and abandonment, how much more do you think the children go through? 

We think we are the only ones doing it right and refuse to change, so we start making demands that only aggravate the situation. We end up being filled with pride and a critical spirit. Why should we allow our selfishness to wound and break so many hearts? As much as we know that nothing good comes without a price, we should also be aware of the fact that pretence by one or both partners leaves one party in many relationships broken-hearted and disappointed. 

Here are some pointers to look for when navigating your relationship:

 

FOCUSING ON SHORT-TERM BENEFITS

A person who gets into a relationship for temporary satisfaction is soon discovered when all they do is to make demands but do very little to help fix what might be wrong with the relationship. Others go the route of manipulating their partner for personal gain. In such a relationship, a couple tries  to deal with conflict out of fear of missing out on the benefits. 

When a relationship is based on a selfish agenda, it drains the relationship of its energy and creativity. The partners in a growing relationship should take it upon themselves to accept responsibility for its future. Looking at the problems we face in a relationship with a long-term focus  offers us growth and makes us look positively at the future of the relationship. As much as problems damage a relationship, they can turn out to be the growth opportunities if we stop resolving them with a short-term agenda in mind.

REIGNITING WHAT CONNECTS YOU

A full tank of petrol cannot last forever in a car that is moving, and neither can a new car remain in perfect condition if it is not serviced regularly. Similarly, every relationship needs moments of unlearning, gaining new knowledge, refreshment, re-dedication and renewal. A lot is taken for granted when it comes to relationships. 

It is notable that many people believe that they need new knowledge and skills to advance in their career but do not dedicate the same energy to a relationship.

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