In Summary
  • The movie Bioscopewala gives a contemporary treatment not only to parental love but also provides an effective documentation of humanity across cultural and racial boundaries.

There is a wise saying that the passage of time may dim moving images but cannot diminish the intensity of human relations.

The eternal poet, writer, musician and Nobel laureate Rabindranath Tagore went to great lengths and excelled in highlighting aspects of human relationships in his writings. I have since my school days cherished and admired the great guru of literature’s short stories and KABULIWALA tops the list of my favourites. I was pleasantly surprised when the other day I happened to watch BIOSCOPEWALA on an Indian TV channel.

The co-writer and director of Bioscopewal, debutant Indian film maker Deb Medhekar rather innovatively and skilfully adapted Tagore’s story and wove it into an emotionally rich spectacle of the bond between fathers and daughters.

Tagore’s Kabuliwala was about a Pushtoon from Kabul who travels to Calcutta (Kolkata of today) selling dry fruits and builds a special fatherly bond with a Bengali child who reminds him of own daughter back home. Director Medhekar has swapped the almonds and walnuts for a cranked up bioscope.

The movie Bioscopewala gives a contemporary treatment not only to parental love but also provides an effective documentation of humanity across cultural and racial boundaries. Rehmat Khan the Bioscopewala uprooted from his homeland by fundamentalist Taliban militants finds solace, livelihood and emotional sustenance in Kolkata entertaining and pleasing young children by playing bioscope shows for them.

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