In Summary
  • We created a country of two nations – the haves who live in heaven and the have-nots who live in hell.
  • From the beginning, independence came to leaders, the educated and the elite.
  • Educational apartheid educates the rich and keeps the poor ignorant.

The Jubilee government is planning a huge party to celebrate Kenya at 50.

But this party is going to be one-sided. The rich few will make merry as the poor, hungry masses look on.

After independence, we did not create one country of all Kenyans.

We created a country of two nations – the haves who live in heaven and the have-nots who live in hell.

We also created a country of 42 ethnic nations that claim unity but refuse to eat together.

While the African elite got the big jobs, schools, mansions, residential areas, hospitals and farms of former white masters, poor people, workers, landless and peasants kept their hunger and jiggers.

EDUCATED ELITE

From the beginning, independence came to leaders, the educated and the elite.

It did not come to the poor, the masses, the landless, the unemployed, manual workers and peasants.

And independence failed to come to millions because it did not bring to people what they were waiting for – equality, freedom, stolen land, better houses, better jobs and better education.

At independence, we were told we would eliminate poverty, which the poor people have now accepted as their natural condition and divinely ordained for them; disease that has doubled for lack of medicine and good hospitals; and ignorance that the rich use to manipulate and govern the poor.

For many ordinary people, independence still means poverty, disease and ignorance.

In fact, today intellectual poverty is worse than material poverty.

Worse, residential apartheid separates slums from posh residential areas.

Economic apartheid maintains poverty and wealth side by side.

Educational apartheid educates the rich and keeps the poor ignorant, and medical apartheid ensures private hospitals for the rich and public hospitals for the poor.

At independence, the ordinary African like my father prayed for heaven but got hell.

He waited for Canaan but remained in the desert of poverty.

He hoped for an end of colonial oppression but got tyranny of one party dictatorship.

GRASS-THATCHED HUT

After independence, my father and his family continued to live in the same colonial grass-thatched hut.

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