In Summary
  • According to Dr Ali Mamo, who operates a clinic in the area, this has been the situation for almost eight months this year and it has been recurring for the past five years.

  • The situation is worse during the rainy season as the water is discharged and floods the doorsteps of almost all buildings.

It is a busy day on Eastleigh’s Second Avenue in Section One and vendors are displaying their fruits and snacks on the roadside.

Beneath their stands is raw sewage making its way to the road. The stench can be smelt from a distance.

DISCHARGE

Unconcerned of the danger they are exposed to, some of the traders are preparing food, including chapati, right next to the hole discharging waste water running for over a 300-metre stretch.

Ms Faith Mumbi, who sells vegetables, says she is used to the smell although the sewage is an eyesore.

“This is where we spend most of our time during the day to earn a living — I know it might be risky but we don’t have an alternative,” said Ms Mumbi.

According to Dr Ali Mamo, who operates a clinic in the area, this has been the situation for almost eight months this year and it has been recurring for the past five years.

The situation is worse during the rainy season as the water is discharged and floods the doorsteps of almost all buildings.

“There are eateries, bakeries, clinics, butcheries and fruit vendors who are doing their businesses in this environment,” he said. “It poses a great health danger considering the big population here.”

During the rainy season, the medic said, not only are businesses affected but also residential houses in the area.

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