In Summary
  • After her miscarriage, she noticed the gaps that existed in the area of new-born deaths.
  • People did not know how to be there for me and relatives spread rumours as to what must have caused the miscarriage

Wanjiru Kihusa's loss of two of her unborn babies birthed, 'Still A Mum', an organisation that supports parents who have experienced child loss. She shares her journey with Soni Kanake.

  

Wanjiru Kihusa, 30, was devastated when she lost her daughter at 20 weeks of pregnancy in 2013.

"After the loss, I noticed the gaps that existed in the area of new-born deaths. People did not know how to be there for me and relatives spread rumours as to what must have caused the miscarriage," explains Wanjiru.

She was mourning the loss of her child but says she felt nobody understood what she was going through. "Counsellors know in theory how to handle a bereaved person but none I encountered had walked with someone after the loss of a baby," says Wanjiru.

Armed with a Master’s degree in communications and PR and a Bachelor’s degree in IT, she was working at an IT firm as a client service manager at the time.

"I needed to understand and get healing from the pain I was going through so I quit my job and started researching," says Wanjiru.

"I started blogging about my experience and generally on child loss, and offered advice on how to support someone who has lost a baby. My blogs and social media posts led to many inbox messages and physical meeting with parents who had experienced child loss.

"I felt I needed to do more so I started Still A Mum, an organisation that supports parents who have gone through child loss. I researched online, which gave me insight. I added that information to what I already had acquired to start my organisation," explains Wanjiru.

DEVASTATING NEWS

Wanjiru and her husband suffered a second miscarriage in 2014. She was broken. In 2015 the couple received more bad news as Wanjiru was diagnosed with bilateral blocked fallopian tubes. This was devastating and drained her emotionally.

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