In Summary
  • The father-son strained relationship narrative was in there alright, but nothing like I have experienced before.
  • It is a sad story of a son who seeks his father’s affirmation; it is told with heart wringing vulnerability that shows the extremities of the human soul in seeking approval.
  • The author unpacks secrets with each turn of the story and at one point, I felt like he was beginning a whole new book right in the middle of the story.

Daddy issues are fast becoming a modern day cliché. Although there are men out here who are doing the best they can to be responsible, loving and caring fathers, their deadbeat counterparts are more pronounced.

By deadbeat, I am also referring to fathers who provide financially, but that’s as far as it goes, showing love is a foreign concept to them.

My friend recommended I read The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini claiming that I would love the fresh perspective and intricate details on daddy issues in the book.

At first, I was nonchalant because I felt I had read so much on today’s failing fathers from newspaper articles, scientific studies and even social media timelines when people opted to celebrate their moms on Father’s day.

I only got the book because I had previously read A Thousand Splendid Suns by the same author and I could not put down; I read it in one sitting. I figured The Kite Runner wouldn’t be so bad.

HOMETOWN

Khaled Hosseini is an Afghan from Kabul and he tells stories in the setting of his hometown--at least for the two books I have read.

In addition, he was named a US goodwill envoy to the United Nations Refugee Agency and both his books have snippets of war skirmishes, plight of refugees and rebuilding life after war.

These first-hand experiences make him create characters that jump to life the moment you begin to flip through the pages. My encounter with The Kite Runner lasted a straight six hours, with very few bathroom breaks in between.

The father-son strained relationship narrative was in there alright, but nothing like I have experienced before. The story is told in the voice of the son seeking his father’s affirmation; it is told with heart wringing vulnerability that shows the extremities of the human soul in seeking approval.

The author sneaks in some Farsi (one of the Iranian languages spoken in Afghanistan) vocabulary that draws you deeper into this universe of pain, loss, revenge and…redemption.

The language bears some resemblance to our Swahili for instance, they call wedding awroussi which sounds much like harusi in Swahili.

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