In Summary
  • When Casper was in Form Two, he fell ill in the third term and he was partially paralysed on the left side of his body.
  • In the second term of Form Three when he dropped out of school to seek medication as his health had deteriorated.
  • After a year, he decided to go back to school.
  • His parents could not afford fees and other expenses in his former school, so they enrolled him at Kasisit Secondary School.
  • He passed his KCSE exam but his parents could not afford fees for higher education.

At the busy Olive Inn Estate stage in Nakuru Town, stands a young man dressed in a white apron, earnestly serving the endless queue of customers walking up to him.

It is hard to miss Casper Chebii’s trolley with its steaming hot sausages, smokies, and boiled eggs.

Chebii, 23, is a civil engineering student at the Rift Valley Institute of Science and Technology (RVIST) and has been running his business on the side since July 2017. He is grateful for the opportunities life has thrown his way, after a seemingly low period in his life.

“I was born and raised in Baringo County. I am the seventh child in a family of eight siblings. I have always been a bright student and despite my financial challenges, I scored 351 marks in my KCPE exam, which secured me a position at Moi High School Kabartonjo,” he says.

AILING

When Casper was in Form Two, he fell ill in the third term and he was partially paralysed on the left side of his body. He had developed allergies because of the cold and was later diagnosed with pneumonia. But he continued with his studies until the second term of Form Three when he dropped out of school to seek medication as his health had deteriorated.

Casper Chebii waits for customers at his stand in Nakuru Town.

Casper Chebii waits for customers at his stand in Nakuru Town. PHOTO | AYUB MUIYURO

His family was devastated and went from one hospital to another seeking the ultimate treatment to help him recover. But after so many journeys and a fortune spent on treatment, with little improvement, they eventually also used herbal medicines.

“I was always the top 10 student and my sickness stressed me so much, especially since most of my peers were in their final year in high school. After a year of medication, I had not fully recovered but I still wanted to go back to school,” he says.

His parents could not afford fees and other expenses in his former school, so they enrolled him at Kasisit Secondary School. Casper joined the Form Three class and emerged position 4 out of the 79 students. He later sat his KCSE exam and scored a B-.

Casper was offered a position at Technical University of Kenya but his parents were unable to raise the school fees. Casper then decided to join his older brother in Nakuru. His brother owned a butchery in town and Casper helped out. He started saving his income and in 2016 he enrolled at RVIST, where he is pursuing a diploma in civil engineering.

SIDE HUSTLE

Shortly after enrolling for the course, he decided to start a business to enable him pay his school fees and be self-sustainable.

Page 1 of 2