In Summary
  • When I was six years old, my mother asked the Brothers of Mother Teresa Missionaries, who run a children’s charity in Kibera, to enrol us at the Missionaries of Charity New Life School in Kiandaa.
  • They obliged. But every day, it was a cat and mouse game. We had to ensure that our stepfather had left the house before we left for school.
  • Got feedback on this story? E-mail lifeandstyle@ke.nationmedia.com

I was always a hungry child. At one time, I had to sell water and beg by the roadside to fill my empty stomach. But today, I have over 70 children under my care. My name is Irene Kasandi. I am 26 years old and I have been running the Kibera Pride Children’s Home for the last four years.

I grew up in the dark, littered alleys of Kibera slums in Nairobi. My childhood was surrounded by the images of lack and poverty. My father passed away when I was two years old and immediately thereafter, my mother remarried.

My brother, Milton Agamu, and I begged our stepfather to take us to school but instead of yielding to our pleas, he would scold us.

“You are not going anywhere. You will stay here!” His words, in that bellowing voice he had, scared me stiff.

FINALLY IN SCHOOL

When I was six years old, my mother asked the Brothers of Mother Teresa Missionaries, who run a children’s charity in Kibera, to enrol us at the Missionaries of Charity New Life School in Kiandaa. They obliged. But every day, it was a cat and mouse game. We had to ensure that our stepfather had left the house before we left for school.

Every evening after school, we would go to the Brothers, who lived near our house, to eat and do our homework. Then we would pack some of the leftover food to take home to our mother.

Luckily, in 1999, the Brothers got me a sponsor, the AVSI Foundation – an organisation that sponsors the education of vulnerable children in slums in Africa. This saw me join St Mary Girls School, a boarding primary school in Narok the following year in Standard Six.

Some of the children work on their colouring exercises at the home. PHOTO| COURTESY

ESCAPED THROUGH THE WINDOW

It was not easy for my stepfather to let me go. He caused a fight that evening, and I escaped through the window and sought refuge with the Brothers. It was at 7pm and I told the Brothers that I was not going back home. I spent the night there.

I was served ugali, sukuma wiki with beef, and a warm cup of tea as I watched television. I was later shown where to sleep in a room that had a cosy bed and a flushing toilet! As I locked the door, I felt some inner peace that had never been there before. In retrospect, that was my epiphany. I told God to take away all my suffering and thought of the many children that I knew in the neighbourhood who were suffering like me. I vowed to myself that I would start a children’s home and take care of them.

LAUGHED AT ME

In the morning, after I had tea, buttered bread and sausages, I asked the Brothers if I could stay with them until I finished school. But they told me that they could not because they were not authorised to do so. That hurt me. I told them that I would start a children’s home in Kibera when I grow up. They looked at me and laughed.

After 8am, when the Brothers were sure that my stepfather had probably left the house, they gave me some money and instructed that I take it to my mother for my school shopping, which she did before taking me back. The Brothers took me in their car and drove all the way to Narok. It was the longest drive of my life.

REMAINED IN SCHOOL

I got to St Mary’s Girls primary school and was admitted into Standard Six. The environment was clean, unlike Kibera. I got to know that there were other better ways of living with my own comfortable bed, a warm shower in the morning and flushing toilets. Over midterm breaks, I opted to remain in school.

I later sat for my Kenya Certificate of Primary Education (KCPE) in 2002 and passed well. With support from the Brothers I joined Consolata Girls High School Meru in 2003.

The principal of the school, a nun, encouraged me to work hard. Over the midterm breaks, I would stay in school with her and she would shop for me. Our close relationship later led to my joining the Sisters of Mother Teresa, after finishing school in 2007.

Irene Kasandi (middle) with some of the children after school. PHOTO| COURTESY

RESPONDING TO A CALLING

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