In Summary
  • It’s believed that Rwerea is where Kaura O Becau — the founder of Njuri Ncheke — camped immediately the Ameru settled in their present-day location.
  • Mr Jeremiah Kanampiu, a researcher of Ameru history, says Rwerea is the heart of the community’s traditional laws.

About a kilometre from Mikinduri Town in Tigania Central Sub-County, a thick grove of indigenous trees and shrubs stands out.

This is the Rwerea Njuri Ncheke Shrine that evokes awe and fear among the Ameru.

Njuri Ncheke, which means council of the chosen few, formed the legislative, judicial and executive arms of the Ameru traditional government. The council of elders comprises men of high integrity.

While Nchiru Njuri Ncheke headquarters is meant for making major decisions affecting the Ameru, Rwerea is superior to other shrines across the region.

Nchiru served as the meeting point of councils from the eight Ameru sub-tribes while Rwerea was the apex court and origin of the Ameru governance system.

Rwerea, which is referred to as Tula e Mumeru (the top judicial agency of the Ameru), is where disputes or matters that have proved difficult for the smaller councils of elders are settled.

'KITHIRI' RITUAL

It’s believed that Rwerea is where Kaura O Becau — the founder of Njuri Ncheke — camped immediately the Ameru settled in their present-day location.

At this shrine, an elaborate ritual known as Kithiri meant to settle a complex issue is usually conducted.

It could be a situation in which an individual adamantly maintains innocence in a row where evidence is hard to come by.

Kithiri includes slaughtering an animal. Curses are then invoked against the perpetrator of the said offence.

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