In Summary
  • The property was built around the concept of a traditional Luo homestead.
  • Kisumu Museum senior curator Phoebe Awiti says the land was donated by the municipal council.
  • The museum stores and disseminates information on cultural and natural heritage, with an emphasis on western Kenya.

Along Kisumu-Kericho Highway, almost 2km away from the lakeside city’s CBD, lies Kisumu Museum.

The property was built around the concept of a traditional Luo homestead. The museum was built by the government with support from Unesco and was officially opened to the public on April 7, 1980.

Kisumu museum

A diorama of a lion with its prey inside the Kisumu Museum's gallery. The museum is rich with information on the culture and heritage of Nyanza, rift Valley and westers Kenya people. PHOTO | ELIZABETH OJINA | NATION MEDIA GROUP

Kisumu Museum senior curator Phoebe Awiti says the land was donated by the municipal council.

EDUCATIONAL SERVICES

“Former Mayor Grace Onyango allocated the land to the museum. It was built for three years, courtesy of funding from Unesco,” says Ms Awiti.

The museum provides educational services to schools in its neighbourhood. Children pay Sh50, and adults Sh100. Non-resident children and adults pay Sh200 and Sh400, respectively, to enter the museum.

Kisumu museum

The gallery, which serves as a learning centre. Students flock the museum to explore the rich culture of western Kenya. PHOTO | ELIZABETH OJINA | NATION MEDIA GROUP

The museum stores and disseminates information on cultural and natural heritage, with an emphasis on western Kenya.

At the gallery, there are different displays of the material culture of the people of western, Rift Valley and Nyanza.

Page 1 of 2