In Summary
  • Four high-end vehicles were left to rot at the police headquarters when Baktash Akasha and Ibrahim Akasha were first arrested in connection to drugs in 2014.
  • Perhaps the same fate awaits Swaleh Yusuf Ahmed, alias Kandereni, who has been among top drug dealers that are seen to fill the vacuum left by the Akashas.

An abandoned house locked with a huge padlock is what has become of an immaculately built residence that is enclosed by a lengthy perimeter wall topped with electric lines along Beach Road in Nyali.

This is one of the Akasha family’s posh residences in Mombasa. A peep through the main gate of the residence tells of a fallen empire that once ruled without limits.

Here, during their heyday, one could barely spend less than 10 minutes before more than five top-of-the-range vehicles entered or exited from the compound of the luxurious house with 24-hour CCTV surveillance.

In just five years, the world has turned upside down for the once dreaded family that operated with impunity, especially at the Coast.

Now, their drug empire is splintered and controlled by ‘midgets’ – as they are known in the criminal underworld – with almost everyone being their own boss and making a killing out of it, even as security operatives go hard on them.

At their peak, bribery, as opposed to mafia-style killing and extortion associated with drug barons elsewhere in the world, was the modus operandi of the Akashas’ well-oiled family empire.

CARS IMPOUNDED

Money purchased loyalty, coerced and intimidated rivals, and subdued any threats to their business.

“The Akasha family long controlled drugs along Mombasa to Europe,” WikiLeaks Cable dated January 9, 2006 said of the organisation.

The flashy high-end vehicles that the members once rolled in on the streets of Mombasa and Nairobi have now found a new home – the Coast regional police headquarters, with some held in Nairobi.

Four high-end vehicles were left to rot at the police headquarters when Baktash Akasha and Ibrahim Akasha were first arrested in connection to drugs in 2014.

Baktash and his brother Ibrahim were extradited and pleaded guilty to six counts of trafficking and corruption charges in New York.

On Friday, Coast DCI boss Washington Muthee said officers from the Assets Recovery Agency are still following up on the cars.

“We are waiting for the agency to conclude their part before we claim ownership as the state. I can only confirm that the vehicles are here with us,” Mr Muthee said.

WARMTH LOST

Also seized by officers from the anti-narcotics unit that year were jewellery worth millions of shillings, which the family is also set to lose.

Page 1 of 2