In Summary
  • With CCTVs all over the country and armed policemen stationed round the clock in banking halls, criminals are increasingly finding it difficult to just walk into a bank.

  • As a result, the use of crude force has been relegated to the back alleys where criminals are likely to get away with a couple of thousands of shillings and a mobile phone if they are lucky.

The manner in which Sh72 million was stolen outside an ATM in Nairobi West on Thursday has once again demonstrated how bank robbers are upping their game to beat the increasing sophistication of security systems.

With CCTVs all over the country and armed policemen stationed round the clock in banking halls, criminals are increasingly finding it difficult to just walk into a bank and order everyone to lie down like it was being done the old way.

WELL-CALCULATED

As a result, the use of crude force has been relegated to the back alleys where criminals are likely to get away with a couple of thousands of shillings and a mobile phone if they are lucky.

Instead, criminals are turning to well-calculated robberies where no shots are fired but tens of millions of shillings are stolen.

One emerging trend is the stealing of money that is in transit.

In June, police and the staff of a security company were placed under investigation after Sh2 million that they were escorting from the Aga Khan Hospital went missing. According to the police, the team only delivered Sh5.6 million out of Sh7.6 million that they had collected from the hospital for delivery to a strong room in the Industrial Area.

During the same month, a policeman and a private security guard were arrested following the disappearance of Sh4 million in transit. The money was the day’s collection from a supermarket’s Mountain Mall branch on Thika Road. The security company officers claimed that gunmen grabbed the money just as they were leaving the supermarket.

During the Easter weekend, a string of robberies left Barclays Bank short of at least Sh14 million after four automated teller machines were broken into.

Police reports showed that the theft may have been planned as the machines were either unmanned, tampered with or the CCTV obstructed.

COLLUSION

Director of Criminal Investigations George Kinoti termed it an inside job. Four people were charged with the robbery.

“They know exactly what happened. The outsiders were just there to facilitate the operation, after which they go and share the money, but this time we will reveal to the public what happened,” said the DCI.

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