In Summary
  • The male worker died on Tuesday morning after what his colleagues said was "a short illness."

  • Sources at the hospital on Tuesday told the Nation that at least 23 cases of the water-borne disease, eight involving staff, had been treated at the facility in April alone.

  • The hospital’s cafeteria has been closed indefinitely as the management battles to contain the spread of the outbreak.

  • A source privy to the information and who requested anonymity because he is not authorised to issue press statements said they have been treating cholera cases on a daily basis.

A Nairobi Hospital staff has died and seven others are admitted following a cholera outbreak at the premier health facility in the Kenyan capital.

The eight employees work in the hospital's catering department and offer services at the staff canteen.

23 CASES

The male worker died on Tuesday morning after what his colleagues said was "a short illness."

Sources at the hospital on Tuesday told the Nation that at least 23 cases of the water-borne disease, eight involving staff, had been treated at the facility in April alone.

The hospital’s cafeteria has been closed indefinitely as the management battles to contain the spread of the outbreak.

A source privy to the information and who requested anonymity because he is not authorised to issue press statements said they have been treating cholera cases on a daily basis.

“The hospital has been handling cholera cases day in day out but now there is an outbreak and the staff are affected. We are treating it seriously. The investigation is on,” said the source.

But in a statement, the hospital’s management on Tuesday denied any internal outbreak, meaning the cases could have come for outside.

CAFETERIA

“There is an upsurge of cholera cases in Nairobi. We have had several cases admitted in our hospital. Unfortunately, we had eight of our staff affected,” said the statement.

It continues: “There is no outbreak of cholera in the hospital. No patient is at risk and we are continuously monitoring.”

However, what is not clear from the statement is why the cafeteria managed by the hospital was closed and how the eight staff got the bacteria.

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