In Summary
  • The crash, which occurred shortly after the plane departed for Nairobi, Kenya, killed at least 150 people.

  • The dead included at least 32 Kenyans; 18 Canadians; nine Ethiopians; eight each from the United States, China and Italy; and seven each from France and Britain, the airline said.

World leaders and citizens from more than 30 countries mourned the loss of those aboard an Ethiopian Airlines flight that crashed on Sunday flying out of Addis Ababa, the Ethiopian capital.

The crash, which occurred shortly after the plane departed for Nairobi, Kenya, killed at least 150 people. The dead included at least 32 Kenyans; 18 Canadians; nine Ethiopians; eight each from the United States, China and Italy; and seven each from France and Britain, the airline said.

DISRAUGHT

At the Jomo Kenyatta International Airport in Nairobi, distraught family members and friends made their way to an emergency centre set up by the authorities at a nearby hotel.

Condolences poured in from around the world as details about those aboard gradually came to light.

The executive director of the World Food Program, a United Nations organization, said in a tweet that staff members from the group were among the dead. Aid workers from at least one other United Nations agency, Catholic Relief Services and other organizations were also aboard the plane.

A chief executive who oversaw the Tamarind Group, a company that operates restaurants and hospitality establishments in Kenya, was also among those killed, according to a Facebook post by the Tamarind Tree Hotel. The hotel announced the death of the chief executive, Jonathan Seex, with “immense shock and grief.”

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