In Summary
  • The ministry denied that it owed Rockey Africa the money, or that the debt was to be paid within 60 days of delivery.

  • It also claimed the firm breached the contract by supplying defective goods.

  • The AG accused Rockey Africa of supplying air, which was later contradicted by the chief witness.

The taxpayer will have to foot a Sh2.1 billion bill to a medical supplies firm after a series of  blunders by the Ministry of Health.

The ministry refused to pay for dialysis equipment sold to the government seven years ago by Rockey Africa Limited.

CONTRADICTED

When the firm delivered the machines in Kisumu, Mombasa and Nakuru hospitals in 2012, the bill was Sh362 million. But it has now run into billions of shillings after the cat-and-mouse games employed by the ministry when it was time to meet its end of the deal.

Apart from the delays in payment, government officials gave contradicting accounts of the deal with Rockey Africa, which in the end worked in the firm’s favour.

In 2016, Rockey Africa sued the ministry after several failed promises. The ministry’s defence would, at least to a layman, raise questions.

The replying affidavit filed by the Attorney-General contradicted the testimony by the ministry’s chief witness, the assistant manager, supplies, Mr John Kamau.

The ministry denied that it owed Rockey Africa the money, or that the debt was to be paid within 60 days of delivery. It also claimed the firm breached the contract by supplying defective goods.

The AG accused Rockey Africa of supplying air, which was later contradicted by the chief witness.

VERIFICATION

The AG claimed the firm did not attach proof of the medical supplies being received by the designated ministry official.

The affidavit also claimed that some of the equipment was not delivered.

But when Mr Kamau took to the stand as a witness, the story changed entirely.

He admitted that the ministry entered into a contract with Rockey Africa and that the firm had not been paid.

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