He rushed to the clinic and, to his shock, found that his wife was unable to sit up or walk without assistance.

Her skin had started to turn pale but the clinic’s staff told him that she would be fine if she ate.

He ordered for chicken from a nearby restaurant but, as he tried to feed her, a medic at the facility told him that her condition had worsened and she needed to be referred to another hospital urgently.

The family settled on Nairobi Hospital, according to Dr Ajujo’s testimony. Prof Khainga however contradicted this while addressing the investigating committee.

SEPSIS

He said he was attending to other patients at Nairobi Hospital when he received a call from Dr Ajujo, who explained the complications Ms Mulupi had developed.

Prof Khainga then told Dr Ajujo to transfer her to Nairobi Hospital. The KMPDB faults him for not disclosing to the other doctors that he had conducted the first augmentation surgery.

At Nairobi Hospital, records show that Ms Mulupi was seen by Dr Ajujo at the accident and emergency section at 11.45pm on June 6.

He admitted her at the high dependency unit but she died on June 7 after an hour-long attempt to resuscitate her failed.

The KMPDB’s Preliminary Inquiry Committee presided over a hearing after Mr Mulupi filed a complaint against Dr Khainga and Surgeoderm Healthcare Limited.

The inquiry found out that at some point between 7.40pm and 11.15pm, Ms Mulupi’s gut was nicked and waste flowed out, causing a blood infection commonly known as sepsis. This led to her death two days later.

AUTOPSY

However, an autopsy report by Dr Daniel Zuriel, who was hired by Prof Khainga, showed that Ms Mulupi had chocked on her own blood.

KMPDB did not believe the findings, and now says Dr Zuriel’s report might have been intended to derail investigations into the botched surgery.

It had “glaring inconsistencies in comparison to two other reports” — prepared by Chief Government Pathologist Johansen Oduor and Dr Joseph Ndung’u, who represented Nairobi Hospital — the board says.

Both Dr Oduor and Dr Ndung’u reported that Ms Mulupi had died of sepsis.

As a result of these findings, KMPDB will now constitute a tribunal to do a full inquiry into Prof Khainga, Dr Ajujo, Dr Charana and Surgeoderm.

“By virtue of the fact that Prof Khainga agreed to perform the procedure, and actually performed the first part, there existed a duty of care owed to the patient,” the KMPDB ruling reads in part.

“The committee further finds that the said duty was breached as Prof Khainga allowed an unqualified person to carry out a procedure on his patient.”

BLAME GAME

Prof Khainga, Dr Charana and Dr Ajujo sued to stop KMPDB from probing them, claiming patient records showed that she had arrived at Nairobi Hospital while stable.

But Mr Mulupi disagreed. “After the ambulance arrived at Nairobi Hospital it had to be cleaned because my wife was leaking bodily liquids. She was then rushed to casualty and then taken to a resuscitation room,” Mr Mulupi told the KMPDB committee.

Prof Khainga had objected to the preliminary inquiry, arguing that one of the members — Dr Elly Nyaim Opot — was on the opposing side of a case that he had filed in court as an official of the plastic surgeons’ lobby.

Prof Khainga claimed he would not get a fair hearing owing to tension between him and Dr Opot.

He also claimed that Nairobi Hospital’s Dr Reuben Okioma had injured Ms Mulupi’s neck, leading to her death.

But Mr Mulupi said Dr Okioma was only trying to rectify the complications originating at Surgeoderm, and that Prof Khainga had attempted to settle the matter “amicably” by sending an emissary to strike a deal at the deceased’s funeral.

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