In Summary
  • The UN Security Council is the global organisation’s most powerful agency. It has five permanent members (the US, the UK, France, China and Russia) and 10 non-permanent members who serve two years each in rotation.

  • Traditionally, the five permanent members call the shots on issues affecting world peace and security, and can veto a substantive decision of, say, authorising the invasion of a country.

Kenya has intensified lobbying among peers to gain a seat on the UN Security Council. The seat will provide an avenue “to our rightful place as a responsible member state of the united states”, it argues.

Ahead of the official launch for the bid in June, Kenya has been lobbying peers in the African Union to support Nairobi’s campaign to focus on issues affecting the developing world.

At state events, Kenyan officials have lobbied visiting dignitaries and made the same plea during President Uhuru Kenyatta’s visits abroad.

SECRET BALLOT

Foreign Affairs PS Macharia Kamau says Kenya’s entry into the UN’s most powerful body will help Nairobi focus on climate change, sustainable development and the region’s security.

“This government has been trying to do things that are exemplary to the world. Taking this leadership in the world is a very rare thing in the developing world,” he told the Nation.

“Our focus, of course, will reflect the times that we live in. When we were there a generation ago, we were a least developed country. We were a country that really did not have its own focused vision and its own capabilities and institutions built up.”

The UN Security Council is the global organisation’s most powerful agency. It has five permanent members (the US, the UK, France, China and Russia) and 10 non-permanent members who serve two years each in rotation.

Traditionally, the five permanent members call the shots on issues affecting world peace and security, and can veto a substantive decision of, say, authorising the invasion of a country.

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