In Summary
  • Inadequate funding has been flagged as one of the biggest threats in eliminating malaria in Kenya, which is relying a lot on external funding.

Kenya has postponed a large-scale pilot test for a malaria vaccine that could reduce the burden of the disease.

The World Health Organisation (WHO) chose Malawi, Ghana and Kenya to vaccinate 360,000 children per year; and while the two nations began the rollout in April, Kenya is yet to start.

The introduction in Kenya, planned for this Thursday, was postponed by the Ministry of Health.

“I regret to inform you that the stakeholders breakfast meeting planned for this Tuesday, August 13, and the launch planned for Thursday, August 15, have been postponed to a later date to be communicated to you shortly. This is due to the upcoming Health Summit scheduled on August 14 and 15,” head of the National Vaccines and Immunisation Programme, Dr Collins Tabu, said.

The vaccine is the first to show promise in reducing mortality and morbidity of malaria and will complement existing interventions.

Inadequate funding has been flagged as one of the biggest threats in eliminating malaria in Kenya. For years, interventions have relied heavily on donor funding.

FUNDING

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