In Summary
  • On December 14, 2010, Ocampo named six Kenyans as bearing the greatest responsibility for the 2007-8 post-election violence that led to the death of at least 1,300 people.
  • Prosecutor Fatou Bensouda later withdrew the cases after key witnesses pulled out while others recanted their evidence.
  • Solicitor-General Ken Ogeto says Kenya wants an independent body to look into allegations raised against Ocampo.

The national government now wants an independent, impartial and neutral body to investigate officers of the International Criminal Court (ICC) and former prosecutor Luis Moreno Ocampo on their roles in cases against six Kenyans.

This is according to Solicitor-General Ken Ogeto, who is heading the Kenyan delegation at the 17th session of the Assembly of States Parties (ASP) to the Rome Statute at the ICC in The Hague, The Netherlands.

THE DEMANDS

On December 14, 2010, Mr Ocampo named six Kenyans as bearing the greatest responsibility for the 2007-8 post-election violence that led to the death of at least 1,300 people and displacement of more than 600,000.

At the time of the violence, Mr Kenyatta was the deputy prime minister.

The others he named were Deputy President William Ruto, the then Agriculture minister in the retired President Mwai Kibaki's government, former Head of Public Service Francis Muthaura and then Police Commissioner Maj. Gen. (Rtd) Hussein Ali.

Also named were the then Industrialisation minister Henry Kosgey and radio journalist Joshua Sang.

TRANSPARENT AUDIT

Mr Ogeto said that the country expects transparency and openness on the details and nature of investigations into six Kenyans, including President Uhuru Kenyatta.

“The allegations against the former prosecutor should not be swept under the carpet. Kenya urges the Office of the Prosecutor to refer the allegations to a neutral entity to conduct an open and transparent audit of these allegations,” he said.

Mr Ogeto pressed the ICC to ensure that the findings of the investigations are made public and given to the ASP member states so that they can scrutinise them and make informed decisions.

“The integrity of the ICC is key for member states to have confidence in the court. We take the investigations very seriously and want them done openly and expeditiously so that the findings can inform our future engagements with the court,” he said.

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