In Summary
  • The admission from the minister arose from a question on whether the decision by Uganda to deploy its troops to Juba was affecting the nascent peace talks in the world’s youngest nation.
  • On Thursday, Igad cancelled an urgent meeting it had planned for Juba but said it was hopeful that South Sudan’s warring parties will end their conflict and cease hostilities.

Kenya will not be sending troops to the troubled South Sudan despite a request from the United Nations.

Foreign Cabinet Secretary Amina Mohamed Wednesday told reporters that Kenya had been approached to help boost the more than 5,500 soldiers needed to guard peace in the neighbouring country.

But the government, taking a neutral view on the conflict, said it would not send its soldiers after all. It would instead opt to contribute to the solution through diplomatic means.

“The UN Security council has approached several countries Kenya and Rwanda among them to contribute 5500 peacekeeping force,” she told reporters during the signing of her ministry’s performance contracts.

“Some countries have already agreed to provide troops to South Sudan, others are still considering the provision of those troops. Kenya supports the implementation of the Security Council but is unlikely to send its troops.”

The admission from the minister arose from a question on whether the decision by Uganda to deploy its troops to Juba was affecting the nascent peace talks in the world’s youngest nation.

But Ms Mohamed told reporters Uganda’s move had been sanctioned by both the government of South Sudan and the Intergovernmental Authority on Development (Igad), the body that has been midwifing the talks; to “protect installations in South Sudan.”

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