In Summary
  • As Ethiopian Airlines conducted a search and rescue operation, leaders and other individuals, as well as organisations, sent condolence messages.
  • As condolence messages were sent, Ethiopian Airlines issued emergency hotlines.

Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed was first to tell the public that an Ethiopian Airlines plane crashed on Sunday morning while on its way from Addis Ababa to Kenyan capital Nairobi.

"The Office of the PM, on behalf of the government and people of Ethiopia, would like to express it’s deepest condolences to the families of those that have lost their loved ones on Ethiopian Airlines Boeing 737 on regular scheduled flight to Nairobi, Kenya, this morning," the PM tweeted.

Twitter users who responded to his message at the time said they had not heard any news of the accident and wanted to know what had happened.

Shortly after, the carrier confirmed the crash in a statement, saying it believed that 157 people were in the aircraft, 147 being passengers and eight being crew members.

MOURNING

As Ethiopian Airlines conducted a search and rescue operation, leaders and other individuals, as well as organisations, sent condolence messages.

President Kenyatta wrote on Twitter, "We are saddened by the news ... My prayers go to all the families and associates of those on board."

On his official Twitter page as well, Orange Democratic Movement leader Raila Odinga said, "My deeply felt condolences to the people of Ethiopia following the crash ... My prayers are with the families and relatives of victims."

Page 1 of 2