In Summary
  • Those opposed to the ban argued it had stripped the release of national examinations results of the glory it was associated with.
  • But those supporting the ban said it had ended the stress brought to candidates and teachers.

The government was on Tuesday under pressure to rescind its ban on ranking of performance of schools and candidates in national examinations.

Those opposed to the ban argued it had stripped the release of national examinations results of the glory it was associated with.

But those supporting the ban said it had ended the stress brought to candidates and teachers.

The Kenya Private Schools Association argued that even though the ban targeted them, they were consoled by the fact that parents knew which schools to enrol their children if they wanted good performance.

“Parents know which schools perform best and if a parent wants a child to excel in studies, they know where to register them,” Mr Peter Ndoro, KPSA’s chief executive officer, said.

“If they want them to excel in co-curricular activities, they also know the schools to send them to.”

Private school owners in western Kenya argued that the government has been formulating policies that undermined their operations and they demanded an end to the trend.

The chairman of the Kisumu County Private Schools Association, Mr Charles Ochome, said stopping ranking was intended to punish private schools.

“The children in these schools are not private; they are children of Kenyans, whose parents pay taxes. And the schools are a resource that the government should tap into, instead of punishing them for what they have,” he said.

REASONS

While announcing Kenya Certificate of Primary Education (KCPE) results on Monday, Education Cabinet Secretary Jacob Kaimenyi outlined 11 reasons why the ministry dropped ranking of schools and candidates. He argued that mean scores did not give conclusive assessment of the learning process.

“Some schools are better endowed than others. You cannot compare the incomparable,” he said.

Former Education Assistant Minister Kilemi Mwiria, who chaired a task force that recommended the ban, said ranking had to be phased out as it was about “comparing the incomparable”.

“We need to ask ourselves questions about value addition. There can only be competition by comparing how schools added value to the students they admitted,” Dr Mwiria, who is now President Kenyatta’s adviser on education, said.

But the proprietor of Temudo Schools in Kisumu County, Ms Carmeline Tado, blamed the government for the shortcomings that came with ranking.

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