In Summary
  • According to sources privy to the discussions, it was perceived to be easier and faster to go through a direct procurement system since previous attempts to enlist a firm for the contract through the open tender system had failed as competitors fought for the multi-billion project.

Two months ago, at the height of terrorist attacks, State House made a call to Safaricom chief executive Bob Collymore.

Concerned that his government was losing grip of the  situation, President Kenyatta wanted to know whether Safaricom would help security agents communicate better.

He asked the mobile phone operator to develop a security communication and surveillance system that would urgently boost the capacity of the national security agencies to fight terrorists.

According to sources privy to the discussions, it was perceived to be easier and faster to go through a direct procurement system since previous attempts to enlist a firm for the contract through the open tender system had failed as competitors fought for the multi-billion project.

TECHNICAL EXPERTISE

The source told the Nation that there was also a feeling that, being a significant shareholder in Safaricom, with a 35 per cent stake, the government was safer entrusting the project to the firm.

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