In Summary
  • The President has made various orders, tough talk and rallying calls to garner public support in the war against graft, but the real results remain anyone’s guess.
  • Archbishop Jackson ole Sapit recently made an about-turn after criticising churches for allowing politicians to clean dirty money on the pulpit through donations.

The release of the “state capture” report has once again punctured public confidence in the ongoing war against corruption, almost a year after President Uhuru Kenyatta gave a definitive speech on Madaraka Day.

The report by Africa Center for Open Governance (Africog) portrays a scenario where the government operates in two-faced conflicted operations with one arm running the formal and the other operating the informal State, all in an effort to make private profits and hoodwink the public that something is going on.

The group says Kenya has joined the ranks of a captured state where the corrupt steal, use the loot to win public confidence through generous contributions, ascend to power and devise more schemes to milk the country further.

According to Africog, narrative control is essential in the mechanics of state capture to keep the public hopeful that there are efforts to eliminate the corrupt class but which only “makes motion with no movement”.

“These arrests have generated much excitement, which is premature. Kenya’s prosecution-driven anti-corruption strategy has always been rather benign; it is ‘capture-mark-release’, a little like ecological methods of estimating the population in an ecosystem,” the report released on Tuesday reads in part.

UHURU'S QUEST

The report lists several arrests and court appearances of people accused of corruption and whose cases have either been crumbling or becoming diluted as part of the knee-jerk reactions to keep the war alive.

President Kenyatta, who will be addressing the nation on Saturday during Madaraka Day celebrations, has become the new face in the fight against corruption.

In the past one year, the President has made various orders, tough talk and rallying calls to garner public support in the war against graft, but the real results remain anyone’s guess.

From the June 14 order that all public officers are to undergo a lifestyle audit to the suspension of heads of procurement and accounting units in ministries, departments, agencies and State corporations for scrutiny, including a lie detector test, the President has been consistent in the calls.

TOUGH TALK

His last Madaraka Day speech was no less fiery. He called on the war against corruption to be fought just like the colonialists were fought and asked the public to stop glorifying the corrupt.

“We know of teachers who impregnate students. Preachers who swindle their flock. Lawyers who defraud clients. Architects [who] build houses using shortcuts leading to collapse of buildings. Doctors [who] give false diagnoses to increase their fees and pharmacies who sell fake medicines.

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