CAPE TOWN

Pressure is mounting on South Africa's scandal-tarred president, Jacob Zuma, to leave office ahead of elections next year.

Here are the ways by which he could leave office early:

  • Vote of no confidence

Zuma's enemies have previously sought to topple him with parliamentary votes of no confidence.

Several such motions have been tabled in parliament but failed.

During the last attempt, in August, the president's opponents fell short by only 24 votes after some lawmakers from Zuma's own African National Congress (ANC) party voted against him.

For such a motion to succeed, a simple majority of parliamentarians would be needed — 201 in total. The ANC has 249 seats in the national assembly.

If successful, the president and cabinet would have to resign.

The speaker of parliament would become president for a maximum 30 days.

The radical opposition Economic Freedom Fighters party has tabled another motion of no confidence which is due to be debated in parliament on February 22.

Opposition parties are now requesting it is moved forwarded.

  • Impeachment

The impeachment process provides three grounds by which lawmakers can strip the president of office: a serious breach of the constitution; serious misconduct; or incapacity to carry out his or her duties.

Two-thirds — 267 — of the members of the National Assembly would have to vote for the president's removal for this pathway to succeed.

Page 1 of 2