In Summary
  • On April 11, the army removed Bashir as tens of thousands of protesters camped outside its headquarters.
  • Bashir, 75, came to power in an Islamist-backed coup in 1989, and headed a brutal regime for three decades.
  • Bashir faces charges at the International Criminal Court for genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity.

KHARTOUM

Sudan on Thursday marks one week since the army ousted president Omar al-Bashir after protests against his 30-year rule, but the "revolution" remains unfinished as demonstrators campaign against their new military leaders.

On April 11, the army removed Bashir as tens of thousands of protesters camped outside its headquarters in central Khartoum demanding support in toppling the veteran ruler.

"This is the first week in my life that I have lived without Bashir," said Tariq Ahmed, 28, an engineer from Khartoum.

"I'm proud of what my generation has done to the dictator."

BRUTAL REGIME

Bashir, 75, swept to power in an Islamist-backed coup in 1989, and headed a brutal regime for three decades.

His rule saw conflicts across the country, the south splitting away to become a separate nation, and regular arrests of opposition leaders, activists and journalists.

Protests initially began on December 19 in response to the tripling of bread prices, but swiftly turned into nationwide rallies against the autocrat.

Cities, towns and villages echoed with chants of "freedom, peace, justice," and "just fall, that's all".

DARFUR

Bashir faces charges at the International Criminal Court for genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity relating to the conflict in Darfur.

But despite detaining him, the military has ruled out sending him to The Hague.

On Tuesday night he was moved to the capital's Kober prison, a family source told AFP.

Seven days on from Bashir's ouster, the army complex in Khartoum now reverberates with demonstrators demanding the dissolution of the military council that replaced him.

MILITARY COUNCIL

His defence minister General Awad Ibn Ouf took power as chief of the body but he too was ousted within 24 hours following intense pressure from the street.

The council is now headed by General Abdel Fattah al-Burhan, a veteran soldier but someone who is largely unknown outside of the army.

Protest leaders say they asked for a joint military-civil council, but what they got was a full military council with many faces from the same regime.

They have now hardened their demands.

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