In Summary
  • Crocodiles and hippos are dying as the Mara and Talek rivers, which traverse the game reserve, are drying up.

  • Wildebeests and zebras are crossing the dry river beds, heading to Tanzania to seek greener pastures.

  • Conservationists have raised the alarm, saying that the drying-up of the rivers, whose source is in the depleted Mau Forest, is one of a series of ominous signs that could lead up to an ecological disaster.

The drought that has continued ravaging various parts of Kenya now threatens wildlife in the world-famous Maasai Mara National Reserve.

Crocodiles and hippos are dying as the Mara and Talek rivers, which traverse the game reserve, are drying up.

Wildebeests and zebras are crossing the dry river beds, heading to Tanzania to seek greener pastures.

Conservationists have raised the alarm, saying that the drying-up of the rivers, whose source is in the depleted Mau Forest, is one of a series of ominous signs that could lead up to an ecological disaster.

Matira Camp wildlife researcher Antony Tira on Wednesday said the dry spell is putting Kenya’s wildlife sector under more pressure as human activities within the Mara Basin reach alarming proportions.

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