In Summary
  • Both secondary and primary schools will close this week to pave the way for candidates to start the examinations.
  • Billions of shillings have been pumped into security and invigilation of examinations that will last a month.
  • Knec has issued tough guidelines to officials who will be involved in administering the examinations.

The start of the Kenya Certificate of Secondary Education (KCSE) examination practicals on Monday will once again put to the test the government’s efforts to curb the scourge of cheating in national examinations, which has been creeping back.

Both secondary and primary schools will close this week to pave the way for candidates to start the examinations.

Despite the tough measures introduced by the government in 2016, last year recorded the highest number of examination malpractices, with the results of 3,427 KCSE candidates from 44 centres in 16 counties being cancelled, compared with 1,205 in 2017.

INVIGILATION

Billions of shillings have been pumped into security and invigilation of examinations that will last a month.

Tomorrow, the candidates will take French (Oral and Braille), German (Oral), Arabic (Oral), building construction, home science planning and Kenyan Sign Language.

Kenya Certificate of Primary Education (KCPE) rehearsals are set for October 28 while the examinations will run from October 29 to 31. The main KCSE examinations will start on November 4 and end on November 27.

The Kenya National Examinations Council (Knec) has issued tough guidelines to officials who will be involved in administering the examinations.

Some 400 monitors deployed across the country will have unfettered access to the examination centres, upon presentation of their identification badges.

Education Cabinet Secretary George Magoha has also warned that stern action will be taken against those involved in examination cheating.

CHEATING HOTSPOTS

Among counties that have been flagged are possible cheating hotspots are Machakos, Meru, Isiolo, Turkana, West Pokot, Kericho, Narok, Elgeyo-Marakwet, Bungoma, Kisumu, Kisii, Homa Bay, Migori, Garissa, Wajir and Mandera.

Now, the government’s headache is how to deal with some centre managers, supervisors and invigilators who, though thoroughly vetted and entrusted with the exams, go out to help the candidates to cheat.

Last year, some teachers accessed examination materials, worked out the answers and shared them out to the candidates.

Knec acting Chief Executive Officer Mercy Karogo has assured the country that all is set for the examinations to kick off and advised candidates to focus on preparation and not to be tempted to engage in irregularities.

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