In Summary
  • Teachers said that many schools do not have enough sanitation facilities, dormitories and classes to take care of the higher student populations.
  • TSC chairperson Lydia Nzomo said public schools are facing teacher shortage but asked them to use available resources to improve education quality.

Education Cabinet Secretary George Magoha on Tuesday ruled out an increase in secondary school tuition fees and instead asked parents to contribute to projects on a voluntary basis.

He said there are many wealthy and middle class parents willing to support schools through financial contributions, and that they should be encouraged to do so.

“Can we, as parents and the government, look for other solutions?” Prof Magoha posed.

“I’ve spoken to many people, including Kenya Secondary Schools Heads Association (Kessha) chairman Kahi Indimuli, and I know there is a group of Kenyan middle class who won’t mind contributing to better schools. Why is the government saying there’s a blanket ban?

“Can parents and teachers associations be empowered to agree on how much they can contribute as long as the poor, diligent child is not forced to pay?”

TRANSITION POLICY

Prof Magoha, who was addressing head teachers at their annual conference in Mombasa, however warned them against forcing parents into such projects.

He was responding to complaints by the head teachers that government funding is not enough to foot bills and develop schools, and that many institutions are struggling to pay bills, especially in the wake of increased enrolment as a result of the government’s drive to achieve 100 per cent transition from primary to secondary schools.

The principals said the policy is forcing many schools to grapple with congestion due to limited accommodation capacity.

Many schools do not have enough sanitation facilities, dormitories and classes to take care of the higher student populations, the teachers said.

“This has been very stressful,” said Mr Barrow Sadeko, the principal of Modogashe Secondary School in Lagdera. “Head teachers in boarding schools are facing a very difficult situation as they manage everything with the little funds.”

FUNDING

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