In Summary
  • Education Cabinet Secretary George Magoha has instructed that examination materials be transported in the presence of the police and using government vehicles.
  • Prof Magoha has warned that any examination official found tampering with the papers or contravening any rule will be dealt with harshly.

The Government was last night preparing to use police helicopters to fly Kenya Certificate of Primary Education (KCPE) examination papers to flood-hit regions.

Ministry of Education officials said on Sunday the papers will be flown to Mandera, Wajir, Tana River and Isiolo, where roads have been cut off by the short rains currently pounding most parts of the country.

The Nation also learnt on Sunday that the ministry has merged some of the centres in areas where roads have been rendered impassable in order to reduce unnecessary travel and avoid disruptions.

A total of 1,088,986 KCPE candidates in 27,809 centres across the country will today rehearse for the tests which begin Tuesday with mathematics and English.

They will on Wednesday sit for science and Kiswahili and conclude with social studies and religious education on Thursday.

INCREASED VIGILANCE

Education Cabinet Secretary George Magoha has instructed that examination materials be transported in the presence of the police and using government vehicles.

“The process of opening examination papers in examination rooms must be witnessed by candidates, security forces, an invigilator and a supervisor to ensure that no mistake is made. This is meant to address cases where officials open scripts before the scheduled time,” said Prof Magoha last week.

The Kenya National Examinations Council (Knec) will engage contracted professionals - including 1,437 deputy county commissioners, sub-county directors of education and the Teachers Service Commission (TSC).

“We will also engage 1,916 security officers, 339 sub-county examination officers , 339 TSC Officers, 339 clerks and 339 data capturers,” added Dr Mercy Karogo, Knec's CEO.

The Knec will use a total of 479 containers for storage of examination materials as opposed to the 459 used in 2018.

CHEATING CARTELS

Prof Magoha has warned that any examination official found tampering with the papers or contravening any rule will be dealt with harshly.

He said last week that the ministry had mapped out more than 300 examination centres where cheating is likely to take place and has increased surveillance in those areas.

Ministry officials have also plugged likely loopholes in which cheating cartels were hoping to cash in on.

Some of these include opening question papers before the stipulated time, tampering with the materials during transportation or having teachers coaching the candidates.

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