In Summary
  • Publishers have warned that they will lose billions of shillings, since they put money into the production of new learning materials.
  • Private schools described the development as disturbing, saying many resources will go to waste.
  • Parents association chairman Nicholas Maiyo said they were surprised by the government's sudden change of heart.
  • Members of international evaluation teams are expected to present their report to the Cabinet secretary on Monday so it is not clear what her decision will be.

Confusion continued to reign on Wednesday following the announcement by the Ministry of Education of the indefinite suspension of the new curriculum's rollout.

The new curriculum was to be rolled out from nursery school to class three while piloting in class four was to start next year. This after two years of piloting for the lower classes.

HUGE LOSSES

On Wednesday, publishers warned that they will lose billions of shillings, since they put money in the publishing of new learning materials.

Parents also raised concerns about the decision, saying that most of them had bought books.

They wondered what will happen to children who are supposed to revert to the old curriculum.

Donors and other partners had also pumped in billions of shillings for the provision of new learning materials

Millions of shillings were also used to host two national conferences as well as pay several consultants hired to drive the process.

WASTAGE

Private schools described the development as disturbing, saying many resources will go to waste.

"On the new curriculum implementation, the position of the KPSA has been very clear; forward ever backward never. We started it. We must live with it and continuously improve/work on its challenges to make it better as we move along," said a statement from the Kenya Private Schools Association (KPSA).

The association insisted that the government must release the Grade Four designs and allow teachers to prepare for next term.

Parents association chairman Nicholas Maiyo said they were surprised by the government's sudden change of heart.

"We were prepared for the new curriculum and had purchased books. Now we don't know what to do," said Mr Maiyo.

The national steering committee meeting which was to take place on Thursday has been postponed indefinitely.

However, international evaluators of the curriculum are expected to deliver the report on the new curriculum on Monday to Education Cabinet Secretary Amina Mohamed.

NO CONSULTATION

Ms Mohamed's announcement came as a surprise to many Kenyans, including those tasked with reviewing the curriculum.

It means that pupils who have been undertaking the new curriculum under pilot will revert back to the 8.4.4 system.

Many described the minister's remarks as personal, noting that she had not consulted all stakeholders in the education sector.

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