In Summary
  • These assessments will not be one-off affairs but a cumulative measurement of what the learners would have learnt.
  • The council will be expected to research extensively and come up with the best assessment methods for the new curriculum to succeed.

Many things are expected in 2022. It will be a general election year and polls tend to be emotive and divisive.

The election will particularly be significant because President Uhuru Kenyatta will leave office.

About two or three months after the electoral dust would have settled, the competency-based curriculum pioneer class, currently in Grade 3, will join junior secondary school.

The children will not write any national examinations at the end of Grade 6, meaning they will all be in Grade 7, as announced by the President on Friday.

They will instead have a formative and national assessment as prescribed by the Basic Education Curriculum Framework.

The learners will not be new to such an assessment as they will have already gone through one in Grade 3.

They will be assessed again in 2025 at the end of Grade 9 as they join senior secondary school.

ASSESSMENT

This will be used for placement as the learners follow paths of their choice. According to the framework, this will be a summative assessment.

At the end of their senior school, the Kenya National Examinations Council will prepare another summative assessment before releasing “engaged, empowered and ethical citizens” ready for university, tertiary education and training.

As all that is happening in the CBC, the phasing out of 8-4-4 would be going on. The last cohort – currently in Standard Four – will sit the Kenya Certificate of Secondary Education examination in 2027.

At every point of exit, there will be an assessment, in the case of CBC, and examinations for those still in 8-4-4.

The difference from the current system is that these assessments will not be one-off affairs but a cumulative measurement of what the learners would have learnt.

FRAMEWORK

Page 1 of 2