In Summary
  • Despite its upgraded security features, officials have raised concern over the increased seizure of fake notes in the new currency, mostly comprising of the Sh500 and Sh1000 bills.
  • These fake currency notes mostly target mobile money agents such as M-Pesa shops and bank agents.
  • There are fears that Kenya could be turning into a hub for counterfeit currencies.

With only three weeks remaining to submit the old Sh1000 currency notes, chances are high that occurrences of fake currency may arise.

 To avoid being duped, it is important to be careful and identify signs of original notes as well as some of the features that fake ones might have.

 Despite its upgraded security features, officials have raised concern over the increased seizure of fake notes in Sh500 and Sh1000 bills.

 These fake currency notes mostly target mobile money agents such as M-Pesa shops and bank agents.

 Here are some features you might find in fake notes:

No lion watermark feature: When held up to the light, the three-dimensional portrait watermark of the lion’s face on the left side of the note cannot be clearly seen. If you cannot see a clear picture of the lion’s face that currency is not genuine.

No CBK initials: Similarly, fake notes do not have the CBK initials and the numerical value of the currency along the silver inter-woven security thread. In most cases, the thread in fake notes is almost silver in colour but is not inter-woven nor do they have the CBK initials on them.

Also, the thread in fake notes does not change colour when held up in different angles against the light.

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