In Summary
  • As the 2017 polls loomed, strategists said the party could not sell continuity to Kenyans and, hence, “must make a pitch for something drastically new to the country’s governance structure”.
  • The paper says this would involve splitting the presidency, creating the office of the prime minister and recruiting cabinet secretaries from parliamentarians.

Jubilee has never publicly admitted to having constitutional amendments as a key facet on which it planned to run the 2017 re-election campaign.

Just before Christmas, however, President Kenyatta hinted at being in favour of changes that would enhance “inclusivity”.

“We said we must look at this issue of winner-takes-all. If that is why some people feel left out of government, we must ask ourselves: ‘Is this good or not?’” Mr Kenyatta said when he launched a pilot project on the universal healthcare programme in Kisumu.

Although the strategy had been prepared in 2015 and later shelved, recent political developments suggest a faction in Jubilee pursuing it with support from the opposition.

PITCH

The resignation of Jubilee vice-chairman David Murathe marks the latest move towards its formalisation.

In its internal evaluation in 2015, the party found it only enjoyed the support of 42 per cent of Kenyans after losing some of the ground it won in 2013. It also concluded that it had not brought new supporters on board and that was unlikely to change “in the coming few months”.

This was in reference to the run-up to the 2017 elections.

As the polls loomed, strategists said the party could not sell continuity to Kenyans and, hence, “must make a pitch for something drastically new to the country’s governance structure if elected for a second term”.

The paper says this would involve splitting the presidency, creating the office of the prime minister and recruiting cabinet secretaries from parliamentarians.

“Jubilee can promise a more inclusive presidency. This can be achieved by restructuring the presidency to include two or three deputies and a prime minister. This will attract more people into the coalition that Jubilee will enter into. The more the positions, the more the government is likely to be representative and can genuinely promise inclusivity, which people are clamouring for,” the paper reads.

BLEAK

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