In Summary
  • Mr Ruto on Saturday made an about-turn on the referendum debate in what observers say is part of a raft of political strategies.
  • National Assembly Minority Whip Junet Mohamed welcomed the DP’s change of tune but described as “irrelevant” conditions his allies have given.

  • On Sunday, the DP maintained that he has no problem with the reforms to the constitution so long as they are aimed at reducing the burden on Kenyans.

The decision by Deputy President William Ruto to support the push for a referendum to amend the constitution has been welcomed as a positive gesture toward a contest-free referendum, but ODM leader Mr Raila Odinga allies have asked him desist from issuing conditions.

The DP’s change of heart came as Wiper Democratic Movement leader Kalonzo Musyoka rooted for an uncontested referendum, while leaders in Western and Rift Valley are divided over the push for a plebiscite.

Mr Ruto on Saturday made an about-turn on the referendum debate in what observers say is part of a raft of political strategies he has put in place to stay ahead of the competition in his bid to succeed President Kenyatta in 2022.

CONDITIONS

National Assembly Minority Whip Junet Mohamed Sunday welcomed the DP’s change of tune but described as “irrelevant” conditions his allies have given in exchange to fully support the amendment to the supreme law.

“Mr Ruto change of tune is fine. We thank him for seeing the light and leaving the devil’s chapel but we want his allies to desist from making demands. They either support the initiative or they don't,” Mr Mohamed said. “The conditions are irrelevant because what is important is what is good for the people.”

Senate Majority Leader Kipchumba Murkomen had said during a public rally in Elgeyo Marakwet he supported calls for a referendum but with conditions.

POSITIONS

“We don’t fear referendum or an election. Should the president and his deputy summon us for a meeting as legislators to communicate to us that we abandon the Big Four Agenda and go for a referendum we will support it,” said Mr Murkomen.

“But should the referendum be called, we will not support a referendum which will make us as Elgeyo-Marakwet County go back to Nakuru yet devolution has brought services closer to the people.”

On Sunday, the DP maintained that he has no problem with the reforms to the constitution so long as they are aimed at reducing the burden on Kenyans. Mr Ruto said that those planning the plebiscite should know that Kenyans were not interested in creating positions for leaders but in development.

"Let the group talking about reduction of seats work with those for creation of positions and come up with the question for the referendum. But if they think they will create positions, we are telling them to forget," he said. The DP was addressing congregants on Sunday at the African Independent Pentecostal Church of Africa, Kithaku, Meru county during a fundraiser.

“Telling us that the referendum was agreed upon under the handshake is lying and conmanship. Saying that the referendum is a must, is dictatorship,” Mr Ruto said.

ECONOMIC

He also said he would oppose any attempt to use the referendum to divide the country. “We know there are people who are used to dividing the country. Let them know that there is a shortage of foolish Kenyans who can be divided. We cannot allow divisions anymore,” he said. The change of tune by the DP means that the debate now shifts on the timing and the content of the proposed of the amendments.

There is a national consensus that the current constitutional set-up is unwieldy. A special audit of the socio economic impact of the new constitution conducted by the office of the auditor general found out that the cost of keeping political leaders in office has more than doubled since its adoption in 2010.

The audit shows that the cost of the bicameral Parliament — the National Assembly and the Senate — rose to Sh23 billion or Sh55 million per MP in 2014/15 compared to the single chamber’s budget of Sh10.2 billion in 2011/12.

“There are concerns regarding cost implications of the expansion of Parliament from a single chamber with 222 members to a bicameral one with 418 members,” says Auditor-General Edward Ouko in the report commissioned in 2014.

EXORBITANT

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