In Summary
  • Juncker's office said Johnson was reminded that "it is the UK's responsibility to come forward with legally operational solutions".
  • Johnson countered that there was a "good chance" of striking a new agreement if there was "movement" from Brussels.
  • Court proceeding could last until Thursday and the timing of any ruling is uncertain.

London

The Brexit drama switches venues from Brussels to the UK Supreme Court on Tuesday for hearings on Boris Johnson's explosive decision to suspend parliament for over a month.

The British prime minister's first talks Monday with European Commission chief Jean-Claude Juncker and top EU negotiator Michel Barnier ended with an admonishment from Brussels.

Juncker's office said Johnson was reminded that "it is the UK's responsibility to come forward with legally operational solutions" to the existing divorce deal that the British parliament refuses to accept.

"Such proposals have not yet been made."

GOOD CHANCE

Johnson countered that there was a "good chance" of striking a new agreement if there was "movement" from Brussels.

"If we can get that done, we're at the races," he said.

But Johnson's political hand in the run-up to Britain's October 31 departure could be weakened by 11 judges who will hear the parliamentary suspension challenge on Tuesday.

Court proceeding could last until Thursday and the timing of any ruling is uncertain.

The Supreme Court's entry into the three-and-a-half year saga stems from Johnson's "do or die" promise to take Britain out of the EU without any further delay.

SUSPENDED PARLIAMENT

Johnson suspended parliament until October 14 in what his critics cry was a blatant bid to keep his pro-European opponents from trying to get Brexit delayed.

The government counters that parliament is dissolved yearly at the end of every session and that Johnson was simply clearing the way for a new agenda following Theresa May's resignation in July.

The court must now rule on Johnson's motivation – and whether it has the right to make political adjudications at all.

The High Court in England has sided with Johnson while its Scottish counterpart called the suspension "unlawful".

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