In Summary
  • Daniels allegedly held her breasts against one female detective's face, before "forcing" the face of a male officer into her chest and "smacking his face with her bare breasts."

  • She performed the same acts on a male officer after "fondling" his buttock and chest.

  • Ohio law prohibits employees who regularly appear "nude or semi-nude on the premises of a sexually oriented business" from being touched by or touching club-goers, unless they are members of the dancer's immediate family.

  • Another officer in the back of the venue went to get backup before arresting Daniels, who was released on bond.

WASHINGTON,

Charges were dropped against adult film star Stormy Daniels on Thursday after an Ohio strip club arrest that her lawyer slammed as a "politically motivated" setup against the woman suing President Donald Trump.

Daniels, 39, was apprehended without incident during a performance late Wednesday at the Sirens club in Columbus, Ohio after officers accused her of touching patrons "in a specified anatomical area."

'FONDLING'

Police approached Daniels, who was topless and wearing a G-string, after she was seen "using her bare breasts to smack the patrons" and "fondling the breasts of the female patrons," according to an incident report published online by a local news outlet.

Daniels allegedly held her breasts against one female detective's face, before "forcing" the face of a male officer into her chest and "smacking his face with her bare breasts."

She performed the same acts on a male officer after "fondling" his buttock and chest.

Ohio law prohibits employees who regularly appear "nude or semi-nude on the premises of a sexually oriented business" from being touched by or touching club-goers, unless they are members of the dancer's immediate family.

Another officer in the back of the venue went to get backup before arresting Daniels, who was released on bond.

Her lawyer Michael Avenatti announced Thursday that the charges had been "dismissed in their entirety" and thanked prosecutors for their "professionalism" in a tweet.

'ABSURD'

The state of Ohio moved to dismiss the case because it did "not have probable cause to proceed on any of the three charges set forth in the complaints," according to scanned court documents that Avenatti posted to social media.

The court papers said "no evidence" was provided that Daniels "appears or has appeared regularly at Sirens."

Avenatti charged earlier that "undercover" officers "asked" for the touching.

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