In Summary
  • Feeney noted that even though they have been working on their attack structure, individual attack techniques have not been forthcoming and it’s what has been the main undoing in the previous legs in Hamilton and Syd

Kenya Sevens head coach Paul Feeney plans to make changes in his team’s training structures so as to spur good performance following his team’s poor run in the ongoing 2019/2020 World Rugby Sevens Series.

Feeney said that few things will need to change going forward hinting that they will need to do more of contact training and tackle techniques.

Feeney noted that even though they have been working on their attack structure, individual attack techniques have not been forthcoming and it’s what has been the main undoing in the previous legs in Hamilton and Sydney.

“There has been progress though we are disappointed with some of the results,” said Feeney. “Our kick-offs and restarts have not been good. We need to get more of the 50-50 balls where our reaction and urgency is massively important.”

Feeney noted that they have also crumbled defensively.

“I know where we are and I am happy but some changes are required in key areas where mental toughness is also required,” explained Feeney upon arrival from the third and fourth legs of the World Rugby Series in Hamilton and Sydney where they collected 11 points.

Kenya finished eighth in Hamilton, New Zealand to collect 10 points but flopped in Sydney, Australia where they finished last to get one point.

The see-saw results have brought major concerns especially coming since the return of senior players, who stayed away last season owing to contract issues.

Many expected the team to post good results what with some of their previous complaints having been addressed.

Players like the try-scoring machine Collins Injera has been reduced to playmaking role and distributor with sprinters William “Lomu” Ambaka and Billy “The Kid” Odhiambo are running out of gas before they make any headways.

There has been massive loss of possession in contact play, the passes have not been exquisite with the missed tackles and poor execution making it worse in defence.

The team’s strength and conditioning aspect has also come into focus yet the team play fewer matches owing to the controversial format that has had many coaches, players and fans complain.

It goes without saying that the team has not lost with large margins, having started most of the matches well with good and organised defence but things change as the match progresses as the players struggle.

“We need to keep improving in everything really hence change of structures,” said Feeney adding that his players are much fitter than they were before the opening legs in Dubai and Cape Town.

Feeney noted that Injera is his best playmaker having shown what he can do with his vision and vast experience. “I am glad he is back alongside Ambaka and Odhiambo. Obviously, they are rusty and their speed is yet to peak but they will eventually adjust to the speed of the game with few more tournaments.”