In Summary
  • Japan's Formula One Suzuka race track is no stranger to extreme weather and in 2014 French driver Jules Bianchi crashed in the heavy rain - on the fringes of a typhoon - and tragically died nine months later without regaining consciousness.
  • A typhoon forced the postponement of qualifying in 2004 as did heavy rain in 2010, and as Hagibis approaches, organisers say that while they want to minimise disruption the safety of fans and competitors is their top priority.

TOKYO

After an approaching typhoon prompted the cancellation of two games at the Rugby World Cup, here are some other examples of extreme weather disruption in sports:

Japan's Formula One Suzuka race track is no stranger to extreme weather and in 2014 French driver Jules Bianchi crashed in the heavy rain - on the fringes of a typhoon - and tragically died nine months later without regaining consciousness.

A typhoon forced the postponement of qualifying in 2004 as did heavy rain in 2010, and as Hagibis approaches, organisers say that while they want to minimise disruption the safety of fans and competitors is their top priority.

Violent storms wreaked havoc on the 303 yachts that started in the 1979 Fastnet yachting race off the south coast of England, resulting in England's largest peace-time rescue operation.

PAST DISASTERS

At least 75 yachts capsized and there were 19 fatalities, while naval and civilian vessels as well as helicopters plucked 125 yachtsmen from the sea.

In 1998, fierce storms battered the 115 yachts which started in the annual Sydney to Hobart Yacht Race. Only 44 made it to the finish, while five sank and 66 pulled out.

Six sailors died and 55 were plucked from their yachts.

The 1967 NFL championship game between the Dallas Cowboys and Green Bay Packers was played in such atrocious conditions that it gave birth to safety rules to prevent players and fans being exposed to such extreme weather again.

The temperature was a freezing -26 Celsius (-15F) with a wind chill factor of -44C.

The whistles stuck to the referees' lips with one ripping his skin off, and calling plays by shouting through bleeding lips.

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